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Can You Be Charged With A Crime in Ohio Without Knowing?

You would think you can’t be charged with a crime without knowing, but it happens all the time. Officers and prosecutors have a choice, in most cases, to file charges based on a warrant or on summons.  Charges based on a warrant mean you are subject to arrest whereas charges on a summons give you the opportunity to appear in court.  You can face criminal penalties without ever getting arrested. Police, prosecutors and courts handle certain types of cases differently, but they are required to inform you of the charges against you.

  • 2020-02-13
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How Long Do You Have to Pay a Speeding Ticket in Ohio?

How long do you have to pay a traffic ticket?

You have a limited amount of time from the date on which it was issued to pay a speeding ticket in Ohio. You also have that same amount of limited time to challenge the speeding ticket. The deadline for challenging or paying the ticket will be listed on the bottom of the ticket as your court appearance date.

  • 2019-11-12
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What Is a Failure to Yield Ticket in Ohio?

Ohio state laws make it fairly easy for drivers to receive failure to yield tickets. At least six statutes cover the alleged traffic violation. Fortunately, effective defenses exist to spare an improperly charged driver the costs of an Ohio failure to yield ticket.

  • 2019-08-27
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When Is Fleeing and Eluding a Felony in Ohio?

Fleeing an Ohio accident scene and eluding an Ohio police stop can both be prosecuted as felony offenses. A driver who gets charged with felony fleeing or with felony eluding can face a harsh sentence that includes jail time, high criminal fines, and a lengthy license suspension.

  • 2019-06-30
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Things You Need to Check Before Pleading Guilty to Speeding Ticket in Ohio?

Few Ohio drivers make it through their lives without receiving a speeding ticket. Some people can’t make it through most years without getting pulled over and ticketed. But that is not what keeps a Columbus speeding ticket lawyer like me in business.

  • 2019-12-20
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Why Can Ohio Suspend My Driver’s License, and What Could the Consequences Be?

The state of Ohio, working through municipal and county courts, the Bureau of Motor Vehicles, and law enforcement officers in the field have more than 20 ways to suspend a driver’s license. The most-frequent reasons people in Ohio have their driver’s licenses suspended are:

  • 2019-10-12
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What Is a Failure to Yield Violation in Ohio?

Ohio state laws make it fairly easy for drivers to receive failure to yield tickets. At least six statutes cover the alleged traffic violation. Fortunately, effective defenses exist to spare an improperly charged driver the costs of an Ohio failure to yield ticket.

  • 2019-08-02
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Should I Tell My Criminal Defense Lawyer That I’m Guilty?

Should You Tell Your Criminal Defense Lawyer If You Are Guilty?

Don’t stress yourself out over the question of whether you should tell your lawyer if you’re guilty. Instead, understand that you will benefit from sharing the full story of how you wound up facing a criminal charge. The more your defense attorney knows about you and your case, the better he/she will be able to argue to have the charge against you dismissed or reduced.

  • 2019-11-26
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What Is a Marked Lane Violation in Ohio?

Under section 4511.33 of the Ohio Revised Code, there are five ways for a driver to get a lane violation ticket in Columbus.

First, a driver can be ticketed for making an unsafe lane change. The state statute requires a person to wait to change lanes until after he or she “has first ascertained that such movement can be made with safety.” In real-world terms, this means a police officer or state trooper can make a stop and issue a ticket for cutting off another vehicle.

  • 2019-09-10
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What To Do if Police Suspects Me of OVI During a Traffic Stop?

Acting appropriately during a traffic stop can reduce your risk of being taken into custody under suspicion of operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OVI). Nothing you say or do will guarantee that a police officer or state trooper will not suspect you of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. However, you can protect yourself from major inconveniences or a criminal charge.

  • 2019-07-10
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