Do I Have the Right to Refuse Sobriety Tests in Ohio?

Ohio gives nearly all drivers the right to refuse sobriety tests. Exercising the right to say no when asked to perform field sobriety tests is a good idea with minimal legal consequences. You will be arrested, but you will likely be arrested anyway.  Refusing to provide breath, blood, and urine samples for laboratory testing after being taking into custody under suspicion of drunk or drugged driving, however, can bring serious consequences. Is Field Sobriety Testing Mandatory in Ohio?

  • 2018-03-16
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When Does a DUI Become a Felony in Ohio

Ohio police, prosecutors, and courts treat most drunk and drugged driving cases as misdemeanors. Other charges related to or filed with allegations of committing the offense that state statutes call operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OVI) are much more likely to be treated as felonies.

  • 2018-01-15
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What Is the Difference Between Reckless Operation and Physical Control?

“Reckless operation” and “physical control” sound like closely related offenses, but Ohio uses vastly different definitions for the alleged misdemeanors.

  • 2017-12-09
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Can I Get a CDL if I Have a DUI Charge on My Record?

The short answer is yes, you can get an Ohio commercial driver’s license after being charged with or convicted of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol. The reality is that reinstating a CDL lost to the offense Ohio calls operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OVI) will be difficult and expensive.  Keep in mind that getting a license does not mean you will be employable.

  • 2017-10-28
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What Are the Stages of an OVI Case in Columbus, Ohio?

While every drunk or drugged driving case in and around Franklin County presents different facts, each goes through six distinct stages. Knowing your rights and what to expect during the early stages of the legal process for a case concerning the legal charge of operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OVI) could help you avoid  harsh penalties.

  • 2018-03-09
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Can You Go to Jail for Driving Under Suspension?

You definitely risk going to jail if you drive in Ohio with a suspended driver’s license. State laws classify driving under many types of suspension a first degree misdemeanor. This is the highest level of offense below a felony.  It carries a maximum penalty of 180 days in jail and a fine of $1,000.

  • 2017-12-24
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Underage DUI Attorney Franklin County

What Is the Punishment for Underage DUI

As Ohio an underage DUI defense attorney, members of The Maher Law Firm know that courts in this state can punish driving under the influence of alcohol while younger than 21 quite harshly. Sentencing guidelines used by county, city, and town judges look like this:

  • 2017-11-28
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Do You Have to Be Driving a Vehicle to Be Convicted of OVI in Franklin County?

Short answer: Yes. Only the person in control of a vehicle can be charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OVI).

Long answer: To fully protect yourself from a drunk or drugged driving charge in Ohio, you must understand what law enforcement officials consider to be a vehicle and that a vehicle does not need to be moving to put you at risk for an alcohol or drug-related charge.

  • 2018-01-23
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Major Penalties for a DUI in Ohio

Getting convicted of or pleading guilty to driving under the influence in Ohio brings many different penalties. The four parts of the sentence that drunk or drugged drivers tend to find the most difficult to live with are the lengthy license suspension, the jail term, the fines and fees, and the required use of an ignition interlock device.

  • 2017-12-19
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What Happens if I’m Found Guilty of Multiple DUIs?

If a judge in central Ohio finds you guilty of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol more than once, you will spend time in jail, pay high criminal fines, lose your personal and commercial driver’s licenses for a year or longer, receive six points on your driving record, and face several other penalties. The Franklin County DUI offense attorneys with The Maher Law Firm provide more details about second, third and fourth operating a vehicle with intoxicated (OVI) penalties here.

  • 2017-11-17
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