News & Blog

Three Most Important OVI Codes to Know in Columbus

Ohio law enforcement officials and courts use the abbreviation “OVI” for alleged drunk and drugged driving offenses. The initials stand for “operating a vehicle while intoxicated,” which is something other states call driving while intoxicated, driving while impaired, and operating under the influence.

  • 2019-01-08
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Do All DUI Checkpoints Have to Be Announced in Advance?

Yes, local police departments and the Ohio State Highway Patrol must provide public notice of every sobriety checkpoint before they conduct it. This does not mean that law enforcement officials have to widely advertise each general stop to check drivers for operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OVI). Nor do officials need to specify the exact times and locations.

  • 2018-12-05
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Can You Reinstate a Suspended License Online After a DUI?

Ohio does allow people to complete some reinstatement requirements of a suspended driver’s licenses online. Other requirements must be  done through mail or physically going to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV). Processing the forms takes time, so submitting the paperwork personally may not result in a same-day reinstatement. The BMV recommends sending in all the required information at least two weeks before a suspension expires.

  • 2018-12-28
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5 Events That Occur During a DUI Arrest

An arrest for driving under the influence in central Ohio goes through five stages regardless of whether a driver gets pulled over or enters a DUI checkpoint. We briefly describe each below. Keep in mind that if you find yourself facing an arrest for the charge that police and prosecutors call operating a vehicle while intoxicated, you have an undeniable right to call a Columbus DUI defense lawyer for advice and representation.

  • 2018-11-25
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How to Fight a Speeding Ticket When You Weren’t Speeding

Fighting a speeding ticket when you know you were not speeding can be well worth your time and effort. Convincing a traffic court judge to toss out the charge will save you points on your license, spare you an increase in insurance premiums, and let you escape paying fines and fees. Perhaps even more importantly, if you drive for a living, keeping a speeding offense off of your record often means that you will hold onto your job.

  • 2018-12-16
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Can Receiving a Traffic Ticket Lead to Actions Against Your Driver’s License?

Getting ticketed for violating a traffic law in central Ohio can definitely have an impact on your driver’s license. The statutory penalties for many traffic offenses include points, and a number of laws call for suspending the licenses of people who plead guilty or get convicted.

  • 2018-11-15
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